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There is No Shame in Seeking Help, Talbot Speaker Hakeem Rahim Tells Milton Students

There is No Shame in Seeking Help, Talbot Speaker Hakeem Rahim Tells Milton Students

Mental health advocate and spoken-word artist Hakeem Rahim was a freshman at Harvard University in 1998 the first time he had a panic attack. By the end of his sophomore year, he was hospitalized in a psychiatric unit, where he received a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and began his journey toward wellness.

Mr. Rahim, this year’s Talbot Speaker, shared his story as part of a presentation to destigmatize mental illness, encourage students to reach out when they’re hurting, and to be supportive friends when someone they know needs help.

“Many people are suffering in silence, and it doesn’t have to be that way,” Mr. Rahim said. “It’s OK to talk about mental illness. There is no shame in seeking treatment, and a diagnosis is not the end.”

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Find Inspiration in Veterans’ Service and Sacrifice, Army Brigadier General Richard F. Johnson Tells Students

Find Inspiration in Veterans’ Service and Sacrifice, Army Brigadier General Richard F. Johnson Tells Students

Milton’s Veterans Day speaker, Army Brig. Gen. Richard F. Johnson, P’19, encouraged Upper School students to ask themselves two questions: “What inspiration can I draw from the service of veterans?” and, “How will I serve?”

The men and women who have served in the United States armed forces have built a legacy of leadership and service for future generations, who can serve in any capacity they choose—whether in the military or not, the brigadier general told students. Quoting Milton alumnus Robert F. Kennedy, he urged students to meet the challenges of difficult times.

“’All of us may wish, at times, that we lived in a more tranquil world, but we don’t, and if our times are difficult and perplexing, so are they challenging and filled with opportunity,’” said Brig. Gen. Johnson, whose daughters Julia and Kiely are in Class II. He added: “In a world that’s fraught with peril and those that would do harm, your veterans have been the guardians of freedom and the protectors of peace and humanity. Celebrate their service and sacrifice by making your own contribution. Find your future, decide how you will serve, and pay the best tribute that you can to those who have served you.”

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Shaping the World for the Next Generation of Programmers

Shaping the World for the Next Generation of Programmers

For the second year, Milton students volunteered to mentor middle- and elementary-school students at HUBweek’s Girl Hackathon, a Boston event that encourages young girls to develop a love of computer programming and coding.

Jessica Wang (I), Charlotte Moremen (II), Amaya Sangurima-Jimenez (II) and Jen Zhao (II), served as mentors during the hackathon. Using Hopscotch, a kid-friendly coding app, teams of two created games, later presenting their projects to the group. It’s not a competition; it’s a chance for girls to explore the possibilities of coding in a collaborative and supportive setting, and to be proud of their creations, says mathematics faculty member Emily Pries.

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Milton’s Fall Productions: Sketches, Songs and a Shakespeare Classic

Milton’s Fall Productions: Sketches, Songs and a Shakespeare Classic

Milton’s fall performing arts schedule features original comedy sketches, a new Class IV musical tradition and Shakespeare’s most famous star-crossed lovers.

Inspired by the Ziegfeld Follies and other revue shows, the Class IV play is a collection of songs, poetry, short scenes and music, specifically tailored for the Class IV actors. The material explores the journey from birth to death and the production is titled: The Class IV Follies: The Tree of Life. There are songs from modern musicals and the classics; scenes from plays, sketch comedies and films; and poetry ranging from Shakespeare to Maya Angelou. The Class IV play is a long-standing performing arts tradition involving the entire class.

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Meet Adrian Anantawan, Milton’s New Music Department Chair

Meet Adrian Anantawan, Milton’s New Music Department Chair

Adrian Anantawan has toured the world as a violin soloist and performed on some of the most prominent stages, but this year marks the beginning of a different kind of adventure: being a house parent to the boys of Forbes House.

“Sitting down at a dinner table and hearing young men talk about things that are really intellectual, and at the same time really having fun, is wonderful,” says Adrian, Milton’s new music department chair. “Getting to know them is a highlight.”

Adrian takes the baton from Don Dregalla, who retired after more than three decades of teaching music at Milton. Adrian is teaching the Middle School strings and winds, Upper School orchestra, Chamber Orchestra and general music in the Upper School.

Born in Canada, Adrian has been playing the violin since he was around 10, and he performed professionally for the first time at 15. He has performed at the White House, in the opening ceremonies of the Olympics in both Athens and Vancouver, and at the United Nations. Audience members have included Pope John Paul II and the Dalai Lama.

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Festival Rolls Out Red Carpet for Milton Film Club

Festival Rolls Out Red Carpet for Milton Film Club

When George Luo (I) wrote his first screenplay at the end of his freshman year at Milton, he rounded up about 20 people who said they’d be interested in helping him make the film. Over that summer, interest fizzled, and George never made the movie, which is OK, he jokes, because, “It was probably the worst screenplay of all time.”

A few more attempts failed; it was hard to manage the process alone. So, during sophomore year, George and some friends founded the Hollywood Filmmaking Club, which has lent structure to film projects, he says.

Last year, the club, which is made up of actors and students interested in directing and writing, worked together to make George’s film, “Under the Wound,” which was accepted in several film festivals. Over that Columbus Day weekend, six members of the club went to New York City, where the 20-minute-long drama was an official selection of the All American High School Film Festival, an event that honors the best of high-school films from all over the country.

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A Night of Latin-American Jazz

A Night of Latin-American Jazz

Three student jazz groups take to the stage in King Theatre on Thursday night to perform in Milton’s 27th annual fall jazz concert. Curtains open at 7:30 p.m. for this celebration of Latin-American jazz.

“We will play sambas, bossa novas, mambos, cha-cha-chas and boleros. Some of the tunes will make you want to dance and some will make want to cry (for good reasons we hope),” jokes music faculty member, Bob Sinicrope. “This promises to be a spirited and educational experience as we will share with our audience background information on the tunes.”

This is the only major on-campus performance of the year scheduled for these groups. All are welcome to join in the fun.

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Poetry Reveals Truth Through Fiction, Bingham Writer Ron Smith Tells Students

Poetry Reveals Truth Through Fiction, Bingham Writer Ron Smith Tells Students

In works that explore the intersection of ubiquitous moments in history and intimate, personal narrative, poet Ron Smith asks, “What is my place and what keeps me in it?”

On campus as the Bingham Visiting Writer, Mr. Smith read selections spanning his career as a poet, and later visited students for a smaller Q&A. In between his poems at the reading, Mr. Smith provided context and described his writing process.

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Reaching New Heights, on a Bike

Reaching New Heights, on a Bike

Clocking in at a minute over four hours, senior Chris Mehlman placed third out of 650 riders in the Vermont 50, a grueling 50-mile mountain bike race that involves an elevation climb of 9,000 feet. To put his amazing finish into context, the top two riders are well-known veteran winners on the mountain bike race circuit.

Chris says he started mountain biking in fifth grade, but didn’t start racing until his sophomore year. He started with races in the New England High School Cycling Association. This led him to Back Bay Cycling Club (B2C2), a competitive cycling team based in Boston, where he has a coach.

“What I enjoy about biking is that it’s a big challenge both mentally and physically,” says Chris. “The training is hard, but I love having goals and something to drive me on. I also love how scientific biking is; it’s a nerdy sport. There is a lot complex data in the training.”

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