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Kalel Mullings ’20 Selected for All-American Game

Kalel Mullings ’20 Selected for All-American Game

Milton’s varsity football linebacker and running back, Kalel Mullings (I), has been selected for the 2020 All-American Bowl, joining an elite group of athletes who have played in the all-star game. Surrounded by his coaches, teammates, family and friends, Kalel was presented with an honorary game jersey, commemorating his selection, during a ceremony in the FCC on Tuesday.

Kalel began his varsity football career as a 13-year-old freshman, playing against 18- and 19-year-olds in one of the top leagues in New England. He will attend and play at the University of Michigan next year.

“One would surmise that all this attention and notoriety would affect Kalel,” said Coach Kevin MacDonald. “However, he has never changed. He has continued to be the same kind, affable, humble and outgoing young man he has always been. Yes, Kalel is an outstanding football player with a bright future, but he is an even better young man who has left an indelible mark on our school.”

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Learning About Local Environmental Justice Work

Learning About Local Environmental Justice Work

Poor air quality, asbestos dumping, and lack of green spaces are just a few of the environmental issues that residents in lower-income city neighborhoods face on a daily basis. Twenty-two students from the Activism for Justice in a Digital World class and two sections of Science in the Modern Age went on the Toxic Tour of Dudley Square in the Boston neighborhood of Roxbury to learn about environmental justice initiatives.

David Nolies, from Alternatives for Community and Environment (ACE), a nonprofit based in the square, was their guide. “We are the voice for the people that don’t have a voice,” he told students. David grew up nearby in a government housing project and has been involved with ACE for 22 years, since he was 15 years old.

As he walked students around to different spots, he explained how Roxbury’s childhood asthma hospitalization rate is nearly six times higher than the state average; how developers would raze buildings and leave behind toxic debris; and how the neighborhood train to downtown Boston was replaced by an inefficient and polluting bus system, making access to jobs more difficult.

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Collaboration at Play: Student Musicians Visit Grammy-Nominated A Far Cry

Collaboration at Play: Student Musicians Visit Grammy-Nominated A Far Cry

Strings players from Milton’s Chamber Orchestra watched members of A Far Cry, the Grammy-nominated string ensemble, play a few measures of a Haydn minuet before a pause in the action. One musician suggested a slight change to the speed of the melody while others nodded in agreement. Another chimed in with a reminder about the dynamics of a section. They started again, the adjustments made.

“The unique thing about A Far Cry is that they don’t use a conductor,” said Milton’s music department chair, Adrian Anantawan. “They’re a fully democratic orchestra and they make decisions as a group. The leadership is shared.”

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In Animation, Faculty Member Yoshi Makishima ’11 Finds Storytelling Has No Limits

In Animation, Faculty Member Yoshi Makishima ’11 Finds Storytelling Has No Limits

For Yoshi Makishima ’11, animating a story is a way to put your stamp on every aspect of it. The animator is a director, writer, designer, and actor, making choices that affect everything from characters’ personalities to the overall tone of a film.

Yoshi’s short film, “Night,” was an official selection at this summer’s San Diego International Kids’ Film Festival. She submitted the four-minute piece after completing it for a class at the Harvard Extension School.

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Field Hockey Season Off to Great Start

Field Hockey Season Off to Great Start

The varsity field hockey team is impressing fans early in the fall season with definitive wins (4-1) against strong teams. In one of its first games, against Phillips Exeter, the team scored in the first 30 seconds, dominating the entire game to win 5-1, which “set the tone for the season” according to co-captain Caroline Guden ’20.

Caroline, who plays midfield, and co-captain Charlotte Jordan ’20, who plays forward, say they are trying to lead the team by example, focusing on “instilling confidence in ourselves, knowing we are a good team and we can win.”

The Exeter win was followed by Milton’s first ISL win against Lawrence Academy and then a win against Thayer Academy this past Tuesday.

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The bottom line? Punctuation matters.

The bottom line? Punctuation matters.

It’s National Punctuation Day, and this sentence is missing its marks:

I learned heed this warning future employees how bosses who are desperate to fill positions convince staff who have expressed no interest in those positions to do the job anyway

The sentence is part of a past sophomore English test, challenging Milton students to insert the correct symbols that create the appropriate pauses and attribution in a long paragraph, without under- or over-punctuating. It’s deceptively simple, but those with a heavy hand may be surprised to learn that the sentence is missing just one comma and two em dashes: “I learned—heed this warning, future employees—how bosses who are desperate to fill positions convince staff who have expressed no interest in those positions to do the job anyway.”

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In The Classroom: Math Meets Art

In The Classroom: Math Meets Art

Five students crowd around a table and take out their journals and origami works-in-progress, some simple and some more elaborate. This is Mathematics and Art, a new half course taught by math faculty member Anne Kaufman.

In this first unit of the semester, Ms. Kaufman is using Dr. Robert Lang’s website and TED talk on math and the magic of origami as a jumping-off point. “Figuring out the folding process allows students to do things they couldn’t imagine doing before. And seeing the bones of shapes has been an interesting exercise,” she says.

Students use Dr. Lang’s TreeMaker software as they progress to more sophisticated shapes. Today, each student chooses an animal from images of “taxidermy origami,” 3D images of animal heads folded out of one piece of paper. First, they must sketch out a stick figure of the base before figuring out the crease patterns.

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Building Tools for More Authentic Online Conversation

Building Tools for More Authentic Online Conversation

When Benjamin Botvinick ’21 and Zack Ankner ’20 traveled to Montreal for McGill University’s McHacks hackathon last year, they knew their competition was strong.

“We went in knowing we wanted to come up with something good and be really competitive, but we were going up against students from MIT, Harvard, and these other great universities,” Zack says.

To their surprise, their project SurfChat, a Google extension that allows people to chat with other visitors using the same website in real time, earned them an Amazon award and the boys offers to intern at the commerce giant. They couldn’t accept the offer, though—they’re too young.

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Convocation Marks the Official Start of the Year

Convocation Marks the Official Start of the Year

At the opening of Convocation, a formal School tradition marking the beginning of each academic year, Head of School Todd Bland welcomed everyone and encouraged students to “listen to your own voice to guide you in learning and in life.”

Messages from Upper School Principal David Ball and Class I co-head monitors, Olivia Wang and Beck Kendig, were other highlights of the ceremony. Mr. Ball spoke about finding moments of joy, humility and generosity in life. He also introduced new faculty members and presented Olivia and Beck with the James S. Willis Jr. Memorial Award.

Both Olivia and Beck offered specific, humorous, and poignant advice to new students as well as returning ones. Olivia referred each class to a summer pop song where the lyrics fit the feel of each year. Beck introduced the year’s theme as a simple encouragement for students to be welcoming to each other and “Just say hi.”

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“Dare to be true” is a lesson for life, Grammy-nominated musician Jidenna tells students

“Dare to be true” is a lesson for life, Grammy-nominated musician Jidenna tells students

Rapper and singer Jidenna Mobisson ’03 returned to campus as part of an expanded Transition Program, serving as the keynote speaker for new students of color and international students, and as a panelist in a conversation with their parents. The events preceded programming throughout Labor Day weekend for all students new to Milton.

“It’s the first day. I know you feel a little bit nervous, but I want to say congratulations to each and every one of you,” he said. “I sat in the same seats you’re sitting in right now, with students who were just like you. Some of the people here that you don’t know yet will be your best friends for life.”

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